Madilyn
surferdude182:

The Dying Sun (by Naveed Mughal)

surferdude182:

The Dying Sun (by Naveed Mughal)

poptech:

If you’re tired of those incessant Valentine’s Day ads hawking heart-shaped, diamond-encrusted jewelry for your honey from the nearest chain store, enjoy a breath of fresh air with the Clarity Project. Started by Rachel Lichte, Shane Rogers, and Jesse Finfrock, the social enterprise sells fairly sourced fine jewelry and diamonds, and then invests its profits back into local organizations working in the mining communities to improve the lives of the miners and their families. We spoke with co-founder Rachel Lichte about how the Clarity Project is sourcing gems responsibly and supporting local communities while imbuing your keepsake with even more meaning in the process. We also got some tips on how we can all be savvy consumers when it comes to purchasing fairly sourced jewelry.
PopTech: How did The Clarity Project get its start?Rachel Lichte: The Clarity Project started as a search for a personal solution to the challenge of finding a diamond engagement ring that we could feel confident about and comfortable with. After research and conversations internationally and industry-wide, we could not find a company out there that shared our belief that the diamond industry has an obligation: the very best diamonds can and must be a powerful tool for community development in historically marginalized mining communities. Jewelry is a platform for storytelling and self-expression. So often the story of the diamond itself is avoided and unknown. We wanted to make this a story worth sharing. So we decided to do something about it. And we started by making one ring. In the three years since our founding, the project has developed three interconnected goals: Create beautiful, timeless jewelry to match the top jewelers; improve the quality of life for miners and their communities; and build a new type of sustainable business that can make our first two goals possible. Shane, Jesse, and I each lead the charge on one of these three interconnected goals. 
Read more…

poptech:

If you’re tired of those incessant Valentine’s Day ads hawking heart-shaped, diamond-encrusted jewelry for your honey from the nearest chain store, enjoy a breath of fresh air with the Clarity Project. Started by Rachel Lichte, Shane Rogers, and Jesse Finfrock, the social enterprise sells fairly sourced fine jewelry and diamonds, and then invests its profits back into local organizations working in the mining communities to improve the lives of the miners and their families. We spoke with co-founder Rachel Lichte about how the Clarity Project is sourcing gems responsibly and supporting local communities while imbuing your keepsake with even more meaning in the process. We also got some tips on how we can all be savvy consumers when it comes to purchasing fairly sourced jewelry.

PopTech: How did The Clarity Project get its start?
Rachel Lichte: The Clarity Project started as a search for a personal solution to the challenge of finding a diamond engagement ring that we could feel confident about and comfortable with. After research and conversations internationally and industry-wide, we could not find a company out there that shared our belief that the diamond industry has an obligation: the very best diamonds can and must be a powerful tool for community development in historically marginalized mining communities. 

Jewelry is a platform for storytelling and self-expression. So often the story of the diamond itself is avoided and unknown. We wanted to make this a story worth sharing. So we decided to do something about it. And we started by making one ring. 

In the three years since our founding, the project has developed three interconnected goals: Create beautiful, timeless jewelry to match the top jewelers; improve the quality of life for miners and their communities; and build a new type of sustainable business that can make our first two goals possible. Shane, Jesse, and I each lead the charge on one of these three interconnected goals. 

Read more…

poptech:

Spectacular snow patterns

Artist Simon Beck must really love the cold weather! Along the frozen lakes of Savoie, France, he spends days plodding through the snow in raquettes (snowshoes), creating these sensational patterns of snow art. Working for 5-9 hours a day, each final piece is typically the size of three soccer fields! The geometric forms range in mathematical patterns and shapes that create stunning, sometimes 3D, designs when viewed from higher levels.

Awesome